All posts tagged: vegetarian

Roast Veg Nori Wraps

Living in Taiwan, we are super lucky that fruit and veg are so cheap and abundant here. I sure will miss that when I leave! I popped down to my local fruit and veg street market this morning and came back with 2 bags full of colourful goodies for less than $8. I’ve been feeling like I need a health reboot, and the best way to do that is cook for yourself of course. I didn’t feel like just plain brown rice and veg, so decided to add in some nori (seaweed) for fun. I don’t need to tell you the benefits of eating seaweed, but incase you don’t know check out my previous post on 5 Essential Japanese Foods. So this is what I did: I  roasted up some veg, use whatever you have on-hand. I used squash, onion, red pepper, cloves of garlic and mushrooms. A splash of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, black pepper and some Himalayan rock salt and you’re good to go. I like it when the onion goes crispy and caramely when baked.. mmm mmm mmm. …

Oh-So-Yummy Dragon Fruit

One of the things I love about living in Asia is the variety of different fruit and vegetables available.  A quick pop down to the market and you never know what you might find! The Dragon Fruit (aka Pitaya) is my latest addiction. I love this tropical superfood because it tastes oh-so-good and is extremely nutritious. As you can see in my pic, it’s covered in a scaly bright pink skin, which is actually thin and peels off effortlessly. The entire inside is edible and consists of white or pink sweet tasting pulp and tiny black seeds (my favorite is the pink pulp variety). I could feel it was good for me, especially my digestion (I had proof!),  so I researched more. Here’s what I found out… – Dragon Fruits are rich in antioxidants and contain a multitude of nutrients. What’s notable is the Vitamin C content – a whopping 9mg per 100g. Typical nutritional value per 100g: Nutrition Amount Water 82.5- 83 g Protein 0.159- 0.229 g Fat 0.21- 0.61 g Fiber 0.7- 0.9 g …

Tamari Toasted Seeds

According to Patrick Pitchford, author of Healing with Wholefoods, the best way to eat seeds or nuts is to soak them overnight to initiate the sprouting process, which makes fats and proteins more digestible. Then dry and eat raw or roast them. “Roasting reduces the effect of rancidity and cuts down on the oiliness, making nuts and seeds easier to digest. Lightly roasting increases their warming qualities making them perfect for the cooler seasons and better for cold or deficient individuals.” I like to toast them by dry frying them in a pan and adding some Tamari sauce for flavor. Yummmmm….. I think it was my friend and foodie, Susan Marque, who introduced this to me. How to make them: Choose your seeds – I usually use Pumpkin Seeds and Sunflower Seeds. – Add Pumpkin Seeds to a heated pan (on high heat), spread evenly and dry fry. – Make sure you shake the pan to prevent burning. After a few minutes the seeds will begin to make a popping sound. – Add the Sunflower …

Gluten-free Chia Seed Crumpets

Ok I am now addicted to making crumpets for breakfast! Feels like a treat yet they are so nutritious, easy to make and can be combined with any number of fruit combinations. I love this recipe (adapted from Larissa Green’s Love Green Food) because it’s not only gluten-free but also sugar-free (ok it has 1 tbsp xylitol)… Ingredients (makes approx. 10 crumpets): – 1 cup rice flour – 1/2 cup coconut flour – 2 tbsp chia seeds (pre-soaked in water for 10 mins) *great vegan source of omega-3 / ancient superfood – 1 1/2 cups of milk (I used half cow’s milk, half soy milk) – pinch of salt – 1 tbsp xylitol powder – 2 medium eggs – ghee/butter for frying – a selection of fruit (I used diced persimmon, pomegranate seeds & stewed apple) ————————————————————————- 1. Add the flour, salt & xylitol to a bowl and mix well. 2. Make a well in the middle. Then add the eggs to the well and start by whisking the eggs. 3. Slowly mix in the flour, and finally add …

Getting Back To Whole

Throughout my life (past 30 years) my diet has changed drastically. From being a child who was mildly addicted to sugar (I was the kid at the party you couldn’t keep away from the cakes) to growing up in a mostly healthy family. Well what we knew as healthy at the time – we didn’t eat much red meat, my mom grilled not fried, and of course everything was low-fat or fat-free. When I was about 25 I became vegetarian (vegan for a while) and this lasted for about 4/5 years until I moved to Japan. I was having digestive issues and non-existent periods which I thought were related to various factors. I then met a very interesting man, an ex-raw food proponent and chef  who was a Weston Price convert, and I learnt about the value of eating full fat and organic happy animal products. I adjusted my diet and definitely saw some positive results. I researched more and more into Paleo ways of eating and read books like Deep Nutrition (Dr Catherine Shanahan) that changed …

5 Essential Japanese Foods

One of the great things about living in Japan has been my exposure to a whole new world of foods. The Japanese are world-renowned for their longevity and health. Here are some healing foods that I have come to love and enjoy in my weekly diet, and I now consider essential food items. 1. THE DAIKON RADISH I absolutely LOVE daikon. I eat this mellow, clean tasting root vegetable just about everyday, either in a salad for lunch (they make great pickles) or added into a soup for dinner. Daikons taste crispy and juicy raw and turn slightly sweet when cooked. They are extremely cleansing and are used throughout Japan as a complement to raw or oily foods to aid digestion. Daikon also acts as a diuretic and decongestant, promoting the discharge of excess fat and mucus, thus facilitating weight-loss. 2. UMEBOSHI PLUM These pinky-red, salt pickled plums deliver a salty and sour punch, as I discovered when I had my first taste a few months back. Not really meant to be eaten straight from the …

Home-made millet tostadas with pesto, carrot salsa & avo

Having picked up various food intolerances over the last few months, eating can sometimes prove challenging and boring and so easy to get stuck into a safe food rut. But all one needs is a little inspiration and Susan Marque! I began taking food coaching sessions from Susan a few months ago and have since learnt a great deal from her. Yesterday I decided to try her Millet Tostadas recipe, (originally developed by Susan for her then boyfriend who was having bread cravings), as I am… oh to eat bread again! Well all I can say is delicious! The tostadas were crispy and nourishing and 100% wholesome. I also made her pumpkin seed pesto (I didn’t have any fresh basil so I substituted spinach and it turned out great) and carrot salsa (I added in some chopped baby daikon radish and a dash of coriander seed). All this topped with slices of fresh avo. Aaah food bliss! Susan’s books can be downloaded here.

SNAP 22/2/2012: Rose Bakery

This beautiful bakery is right near my work and apart from delicious cakes, they also have organic soups and veggie plates as well as fresh ginger tea. I’m a regular, what can I say! I usually go every Wednesday for a light snack, as I have a few hours to spare between work and teaching yoga that night.